Fetlar Museum Digitisation Project

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Archaeology
Fetlar has been populated at least since Neolithic times, and a wealth of remains can be seen around the island. The Finnigirt Dyke, a long Neolithic stone wall which literally divides the island into two halves, is probably one of the oldest man-made structures in Shetland. Fetlar was also probably one of the first places in Shetland to receive Norse settlers, and the island's Norse heritage features very prominently in the artefacts which have been discovered.

In August 2002 the UK television programme, Time Team, conducted two excavations in Fetlar, at Gord and at Aith, where they found the remains of a Norse house and a Viking boat burial. Click here to see some of the pictures taken during their time on Fetlar.

The Norse also left remains of a steatite quarry, where they dug bowl-shaped pieces of rock out of the cliff face. Some of the resulting bowls can be seen in this exhibition.

Click on a thumbnail picture below to view a larger image and a full detailed description.
Lid of a Neolithic pot Lid of a Neolithic pot Fishing weight Fishing weight with markings Fishing weight with markings from the Norse era Fishing weight with markings from the Norse era Steatite bowl from the Norse era
Part of a Neolithic pot Part of a Neolithic pot Fishing weight Fishing weight with markings from the Norse era Fishing weight with markings from the Norse era Fishing weight with markings from the Norse era Steatite bowl from the Norse era
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Funded by:
Heritage Lottery Fund
Heritage Lottery Fund

© Fetlar Interpretive Centre
Beach of Houbie, Fetlar, Shetland, ZE2 9DJ
Tel: 01957 733206 email: info@fetlar.com